Tony Clark: MLB Players ‘Resoundingly Rejected’ Additional Salary Cut Proposal

Jim McIsaac/Getty ImagesFollowing a Major League Baseball Players Association board meeting on Thursday, executive director Tony Clark announced the union would not consider MLB’s latest proposal for further salary reductions. In a statement responding to the league’s perceived threat for a “dramatically shortened 2020 season,” Clark said players “resoundingly rejected” MLB’s ask for more financial concessions. MLBPA…

Tony Clark: MLB Players ‘Resoundingly Rejected’ Additional Salary Cut Proposal

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 16:  MLBPA Executive Director Tony Clark speaks during a press conference on youth initiatives hosted by Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association at Citi Field before a game between the New York Mets and the Pittsburgh Pirates on June 16, 2016 in the Queens borough of New York City. The Mets defeated the Pirates 6-4.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

Jim McIsaac/Getty Images

Following a Major League Baseball Players Association board meeting on Thursday, executive director Tony Clark announced the union would not consider MLB‘s latest proposal for further salary reductions. 

In a statement responding to the league’s perceived threat for a “dramatically shortened 2020 season,” Clark said players “resoundingly rejected” MLB’s ask for more financial concessions. 

MLBPA Communications @MLBPA_News

Major League Baseball Players Association Executive Director Tony Clark today released the following statement: https://t.co/jEdgARWhQy

Salaries have remained a point of contention between the two sides, with MLB claiming it’s at risk of losing billions while players have asked the league to open up its books and prove the reported figures. 

“Players proposed more games, two years of expanded playoffs, salary deferrals in the event of a 2020 playoff cancelation and the exploration of additional jewel events and broadcast enhancements,” Clark wrote. “… Rather than engage, the league replied it will shorten the season unless players agree to further salary reductions.”

A March 26 deal granted players a full year of service time regardless of whether games were played, with the union agreeing not to sue the league for full salaries should the season be canceled. MLB further agreed to advance $170 million over two months in player salaries. 

As the two sides looked to strike a second deal to resume the season, MLB owners became steadfast in their desire to radically alter the league’s economic structure with a revenue-sharing proposal

That desire reportedly persists among owners, even after numerous MLB players spoke out against it. Washington Nationals ace and Players Association executive council member Max Scherzer argued there is no “justification” for the league’s demand. 

“Players are ready to report, ready to get back on the field and they are willing to do so under unprecedented conditions that could affect the health and safety of not just themselves but their families as well,” Clark said in his statement. “The league’s demand for additional concessions was resoundingly rejected.”

There remains no timeline for both sides to complete a deal to restart the 2020 season.